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James, William

Philosophy DictionaryDictionary of Philosophy of Mind
(b. 1842, New York, NY, d. 1910. M.D., Harvard University, 1871). James is bet know for The Principles of Psychology, which is an enormous two volume work that addresses the full spectrum of psychological phenomena discussed in James’ time, including brain function, habit, ‘the automaton-theory’, the stream of thought, the self, attention, association, the perception of time, memory, sensation, imagination, perception, reasoning, voluntary movement, instinct, the emotions, will, and hypnotism.
<Discussion> <ReferencesTadeusz Zawidzki
Philosophy DictionaryTheological and Philosophical Dictionary
(1842-1910) professor at Harvard; pragmatist. Wrote 1.
Pragmatism, 2. A Pluralistic Universe, 3. Essays in Radical Empiricism, 4. The Will to Believe and Other Essays, 5. The Meaning of Truth, 6. Selected Papers in Philosophy, and 7. The Varieties of Religious Experience. Regarding his theory of knowledge: Like the later existentialists, James held that the philosopher's realm is the "world of concrete personal experiences," where the pragmatic method applies, rather than the world of abstract ideas (where speculation is encouraged). "The pragmatic method is a method of settling metaphysical disputes that otherwise might be interminable." "There can be no difference in abstract truth that doesn't express
itself in a difference in concrete fact." Metaphysical disputes are settled by considering the practical (i.e., observable) difference which it would make to the
individual if one or the other alternative were true. "The true is the name of whatever proves itself to be good in the way of belief." "Truth happens to an idea;
it becomes true, is made true by events." Regarding his theory of reality: Reality consists in many "reals" as experienced in a loosely related ("strung along") rather
than rigidly structured ("blocked out") universe; it is a "pluriverse." These reals include a "real God" and relate to each other externally as a part of the "process of
becoming." Reality (including God) is "unfinished," "in the making." Consciousness is not an entity but a function in experience. "That function is knowing."

 

Philosophy Dictionary INDEX:

List of Terms: Terms beginning with "A", Page 1

Starts With:      A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
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A: Page 1 of 2.

A posteriori know...A priori knowledge
A priori, analyti...
A priori, theory ...A priori,presuppo...ABSOLUTE
ABSTRACTION
ABSURDITY
AFFINITY
ALTERATION (CHANGE)
AMPHIBOLY
ANALOGY OF EXPERI...
ANALYTIC
ANALYTIC METHOD
ANALYTIC UNITY OF...
ANTECEDENT PROPOS...ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTICIPATION OF P...
ANTINOMY
APOAGOGIC
APPEARANCE
APPREHENSION
APRIORI
ARCHETYPE
ARCHITECTONIC
ATTENTION
ATTRIBUTE
AUTHENTICITY
AXIOMS OF INTUITION
Abbott, Lyman
Abdera
Abelard, Peter
Abelson, Robert
Abernathy, John
Absolute
Absolute idealism
Absolute theism
Absolutes
Absolutism
Abstract ideas
Acquaintance
Act agapism
Act deontology
Act teleology
Act utilitarianism
Action
Action theory
Adams
Adams, Jay E
Adams, Thomas
Aenesidemus
Aesthetic hedonism
Aesthetic humanism
Aesthetic stage
Aesthetics
Aeterni Patris
Agapism
Agapistic ethics
Agnostic
Agnosticism
Albertus Magnus
Albigensians
Albright, Jacob
Alesius, Alexander
Alexander, Archib...Alexander, James W.
Alexander, Samuel
Alleine, Joseph
Allon, Henry
Altizer, Thomas J...Altruism
Altruistic
Altruistic hedonism
Ambrose
Ambrose, Isaac
Amish
Ammann, Jacob
Anabaptist
Analogical predic...Analysis
Analytic philosophy
Analytical
Analytical philos...Analytical statem...
Anamnesis
Anarchism
Anaxagoras
Anaximander
Anaximenes
Anderson, James
Anderson, John R.
Andrewes, Lancelot
Angier, John
Animal faith
Anselm
Anthony of Padua
Anthropology
Anthropomorphism
Antifallibilism

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